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5.   Ice Dancing

After 17 years of partnership, Charlie White and Meryl Davis finally achieved their dream of winning the first U.S. Olympic gold medal for ice dancing. A unique hybrid of artistry and sport, ice dancing is always fascinating to watch. With an exceptionally athletic performance and heaps of natural chemistry, Davis and White easily snagged the gold.

MCT Photo

MCT Photo

MCT Photo

MCT Photo

4.   Cross-country 

About a minute and a half into the men’s sprint-free semifinals, Russian cross-country skier Anton Gafarov fell and damaged one of his skis. Then he fell again, completely destroying the ski. To his rescue came a rival coach, Canadian Justin Wadsworth, who ran onto the track and silently replaced Gafarov’s ski. As Cathal Kelly eloquently put it for the Toronto Star, “If you don’t get a lump in throat thinking about what Justin Wadsworth did for a man he doesn’t know to speak to, but recognizes as a friend in sport, then you should head to the ER. You need a heart transplant.”

3.   Speed Skating

Even though the Netherlands unexpectedly and vigorously spanked team USA in this event, the sight of a bunch of aerodynamic speed demons in tight, Batman-esque suits cruising around a ring of ice at mind-boggling speeds is a pretty awesome and hypnotic scene.

MCT Photo

MCT Photo

2.   Hockey

American T.J. Oshie’s heroic performance against Russia made Saturday’s hockey match tremendously impressive, exhilarating and unpredictable — everything a good Olympic event should be. With Oshie now a bona fide superstar, you now have one more reason to watch hockey and revisit that movie “Miracle.”

MCT Photo

MCT Photo

1.   #SochiProblems

Certainly the main “event” of the winter games has been the political hoopla surrounding Sochi. From LGBT rights activists getting their skulls busted open during protests, to terrorist hijackings and bomb threats by grieving mothers, to unfinished hotels, toxic water, hacked cell phones and rumors of rampant Russian corruption, the geopolitical drama surrounding the games is now collectively known in the Twittersphere as #sochiproblems.

MCT Photo Vladimir Luxuria, a transgender former member of Italy's parliament, met with reporters on Monday, Feb. 17, 2014, outside a hockey arena in Sochi's Olympic Park. She said she was hauled into a Russian police station for having a rainbow-colored flag near Olympic Park that said "It Is OK to be Gay" in Russian. Later Monday evening, she was taken away again by Russian officials.

MCT Photo
Vladimir Luxuria, a transgender former member of Italy’s parliament, met with reporters on Monday, Feb. 17, 2014, outside a hockey arena in Sochi’s Olympic Park. She said she was hauled into a Russian police station for having a rainbow-colored flag near Olympic Park that said “It Is OK to be Gay” in Russian. Later Monday evening, she was taken away again by Russian officials.

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