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Dean of Students

Snap Spam

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HannahWhite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snapchat is one of the latest apps you can find on most people’s smartphone these days. Snapchat is a photo messaging application where one can send others “messages” as pictures to your friends with drawings and text.  The trick is that the pictures you send are only visible for between 3-10 seconds and then they “disappear”. 

According to businessinsider.com, the active amount of Snapchat users exceeds 30 million. Like many, I have the app installed on my phone as something fun to do to pass time. I mean, making the ugliest faces possible is the best part. This past week it was using the app as usual. I went to check notifications only to find I had been chosen as a Snap Lucky winner for the day and to visit snaplucky.com to claim my prize. Skeptical as to why Snapchat was spamming me, I decided to research the topic. 

Though I was aware this was a scheme, NBC reported that the leak in user data was due to an unnamed issue that allowed hackers to obtain around 4.6 million phone numbers, but a recent update within the app may help put a hold on the amount of spam being sent. It will not be gone completely, but there will be much less.

Upon visiting snaplucky.com users are prompted to enter their Snapchat name. It seems harmless, but what many do not see is that by doing so you are basically signing up your account to be majorly spammed. If you happen to get the Snap Lucky winner of the day snap, just know that by entering your user name you will be the lucky winner of numerous spam advertisements instead of the beloved silly face snaps.

Be on the lookout for these spam chats and don’t fall for them! Happy snapping.

snap spam

5 Responses

  1. Michael Bailey

    Concerning the “unnamed” vulnerability, they did name it. It was the ability to spam the API call and just brute force the Snapchat API.

    Also, I was not a part of this 4.6 million (personally downloaded it and parsed it for my phone number) yet I received this spam so I don’t think the two are related. Maybe the API hack is, but the 4.6 million database is not.

    Reply
    • Colie Ann

      So if I were to give the Snap Lucky thing my phone number would it give me the prize I picked? Or what happens there?

      Reply
      • Hannah White

        Colie Ann,
        It is a scam where when one puts in their information they keep getting spam from the company. Since writing this I have gotten yet another notification like this.

        Reply
  2. Vee

    Just got one of these today. At first I thought it was legit, but something told me to google the site and get a little more information on it. Sadly, it is a scam. I should have known, I usually don’t win stuff :(

    Reply
  3. JL

    Of course! If I win something, like snap lucky winner of the day, I know it’s a scam. Come on people, we should all be aware of this by now. It just happened to me today though, I knew there would be a website pointing out the scam, thanks by the way!

    Reply

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