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Dean of Students

Weak campus turnout for primary election

Nick Thompson / Photographer: Tuesday offered the opportunity for registered voters to play a role in this year’s primary elections.

Nick Thompson / Photographer:
Tuesday offered the opportunity for registered voters to play a role in this year’s primary elections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amidst the thundering roar of bowling balls, the primary elections for Illinois were held on Tuesday in the Bowling and Billiards Center to vote for representatives in the general election.

The polls opened for voting at 6 a.m. in the Activity Room of the Bowling and Billiards Center and polling closed at 7 p.m. Tuesday was the only day to vote for the primary elections.

ISU held early voting elections in the Billiards Room from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., from March 3 to 6, and March 10 to 13.

At 12:30 p.m., only one voter casted a ballot at the Billiards Center since the polls opened.

The locations of polling places in Illinois are approved by the County Board or Board of Election Commissioners. ISU has for the past several years offered a location in or near the Bone Student Center for students to vote.

The people working the polls had to arrive at 5:15 a.m. to setup the polling place for potential voters. Among the workers was Dalton Stevens, junior public relations and sociology major. Stevens has worked the primary and general elections the past two years on ISU’s campus.

At noon, only one ISU student had voted, Stevens said.

“The last general election we had a total of 35 voters from ISU,” Stevens said. “It is really important for students to change their registration to McLean County. That is the only way you can vote here.  These politics affect you more than your hometown.”

Specifically, on the ballot this primary election was the increased sales tax of 1 percent, or the schools referendum. All of the money collected from the proposed tax would go toward school facilities in McLean County.

Furthermore, based upon your location on campus your vote would significantly impact certain legislature. For instance, living near Watterson and Manchester-Hewitt would place you in the 8th precinct and having residence in Tri-Towers would place you in 30th precinct, Stevens said.

“I was standing out here earlier and asked if people wanted to vote and they said they think they are registered, but they were just going to go to class,” Stevens said.

“For this one [primary election] I doubt many people even know it’s going on.”

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